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La Mont Dottin BACKGROUND:

LaMont Dottin disappeared from St. Albans, New York, October 16, 1995. His body was found floating in the East Harlem River six days later and buried in pauper’s grave in potter’s field. As a result of existing law, a variety of unfortunate and tragic circumstance, this was not known to his family and it was not until four years later and years of searching that they were was able to exhume his body and give him a proper burial.

The AB5137 passed the New York State Assembly however, the SB2239 was held up.

The LaMont Dottin Foundation (a non-profit 501(c)(3)) purpose is to advocate on behalf of all missing persons, specifically, missing adults between ages 21 – 64 and equal access regardless of age.

PURPOSE:

The LaMont Dottin Foundation is an organization whose sole purpose is to advocate on behalf of missing person, specifically, missing adults between ages 21 – 64 and equal access, regardless of age, expanding the criteria used to determine when to launch an immediate investigation into the whereabouts of a missing person. Advocate for the planning and implementation of programs that ensures the most effective use of federal, state, and local resources in the investigation of ALL missing and exploited PEOPLE.

HISTORY:

Founded in 2000 by a Dr. Fowler whose son, LaMont Dottin, disappeared from St. Albans, New York, October 16, 1995. His body was found floating in the East Harlem River six days later and buried in pauper’s grave in potter’s field. As a result of existing law, a variety of unfortunate and tragic circumstance, this was not known to his family and it was not until four years later and years of searching that they were was able to exhume his body and give him a proper burial. If a person does not fit into certain categories the authorities will not launch immediate investigation.

Giving Voice to Families:

The LaMont Dottin Foundation serves as an advocate giving a greater voice to families of missing love ones. Finally, the Foundation will work to eliminate the presumption that persons between the ages of 21-64 are not missing.

Bills and Legislative Impact:

In consultation with Assemblyman Scarborough and Senator Sanders presented legislative bills A10149 and S7864 that will: 1) allow immediately reporting of a missing person 2) Require entry into the FBI database creating a repository of missing person cases; and 3) assist in dissemination of material and information, profile sketches; awareness campaigns for public safety.

Legislative Update:

The call went out and the supporters responded resulting in the Lamont Dottin law passing out of the Senate rules committee with a vote of 23 to 2. The vote allowed the bill to make it to the Senate floor where it passed with an overwhelming vote of 58-3 before the 2014 legislative session ended. While the introduction of the new bill may have contributed to Assembly Bill, A10149, being stalled in committee the voice of the people was heard…giving Missing Persons a greater voice and paved the way for passage, in both the Assembly and Senate, when the legislative session reconvenes in January 2015.

Landmark Events:

  • In 1983, President Ronald Reagan proclaimed May 25 as National Missing Children’s Day. Each year the Department of Justice (DOJ) commemorates Missing Children’s Day with a ceremony honoring the heroic and exemplary efforts of agencies, organizations, and individuals to protect children.
  • 1999 – Campus Safety Act Established
  • In 2002 – Governor Pataki proclaimed May 25, 2002, as National Missing Children Day in the state of New York.

2003 – Suzanne Law- Suzanne’s laws is a federal law concerning missing persons signed into law by President Bush as part of the national “Amber Alert”. It provides that there shall be no waiting period before a law enforcement agency initiates an investigation of a missing person under the age of twenty one and reports the missing person to the National Crime Information Center of the Department of Justice. To do so, it amends Section 3701 (a) of the Crime Control Act of 1990. It requires local authorities to notify the National Crime Information Center immediately if someone between the ages of 18 and 21 goes missing. Suzanne’s Law is named after Suzanne Lyall a student at State University of New York at Albany, who has been missing since 1998.

We’re currently building a research team for the foundation. If you are interested in becoming a member of this group, feel free to contact us.

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